Upcoming Classes

Classes at Brooklyn Research focus on the creative and playful use of technology, and offer access to knowledge that might be characterized as uncommon, esoteric, or specialized. Whether you are a creative technologist, artist, designer, or engineer, these classes will extend your current workflow with powerful new tools and techniques.

Intro to Micro-controllers and Conductive Painting

September 20, 6PM-9PM $20-$30

Learning the basics of electronics is easier than you may think. Come join us on a 3-hour workshop where you will learn how to build basic circuits, code simple programs, and experiment with conductive paint.

Students will be provided with Basic Electronic Kit for the class with an option to buy it.

This workshop is taught by Darya Dubouskaya, a creative technologist, and manager of the Learning Center at the Brooklyn Research, and Dimple Mirpuri, an artist, and a media technologist freelancer.

Paint with Processing

September 27, 6PM-9PM $30

In this workshop, we will be learning how to interact with Processing sketches beyond the mouse and keyboard. Using the TouchOSC iPad app and other methods, we will create custom controllers that will allow us to manipulate different parameters in our sketches. We will also learn the basics of setting up Midi and Osc to connect our Processing sketches with other programs.

This workshop is taught by Matthew Ortega explores ways to connect technology with traditional art-making techniques. His work addresses the subject of disruption and plays in various media such as drawing, collage, generative software, and video.

Intro to Unreal Engine 4

October 14-15, 10AM-5PM $300

It’s time to get Unreal! In this weekend course, we will look at how to get started with using Unreal Engine 4. The first day is focused on the background of Unreal, what it’s capabilities are and how it is being used in gaming, virtual reality, video, vfx and more. Day one ends with an interface tour and navigation. On the second day, we will import meshes and textures, build materials, and look at the blueprint visual programming system. At the conclusion of the course, students will have built a scripted environment to interact with.

Intro to Unreal Engine 4 is taught by Matthew Rader, half of the director duo Reed + Rader With the Unreal Engine, he makes 360 films, gifs and virtual reality experiences set digital environments.

Live Coding Music with TidalCycles

October 16, 5:30PM-9PM Donation

A no-code-or-music-experience-required introduction to live coding - making music with code - using the open source TidalCycles language. Participants will learn how to install the required software, make rhythmic and melodic patterns in a text editor, select and manipulate sounds, and apply algorithmic transforms to create complex and surprising sonic sculptures.

Jack Armitage is a PhD Student in the Augmented Instruments Lab, in the Centre for Digital Music at the Queen Mary University of London. Jack live codes under the alias Lil Data on the London-based PC Music label and has performed at SXSW, on Hollywood Blvd, around London, and at the Berghain in Berlin. His research is focused on designing embodied crafting tools for digital musical instrument makers.

Intro to Micro-controllers and Conductive Painting

November 1, 6PM-8:30PM $30-$40

Learning the basics of electronics is easier than you may think. Come join us on a 3-hour workshop where you will learn how to build basic circuits, code simple programs, and experiment with conductive paint.

Students will be provided with Basic Electronic Kit for the class with an option to buy it.

This workshop is taught by Darya Dubouskaya, a creative technologist, and manager of the Learning Center at the Brooklyn Research, and Dimple Mirpuri, an artist, and a media technologist freelancer.

Machines Learning Movement

November 15, 6PM-9:30PM $60

What do machine learning, visual art, and motion capture have in common?

Come find out at this workshop! We will first write some code to record skeleton movement with a Kinect or Perceptron Neuron suit. Then we will record multiple people doing the same gestures. We will then use a python machine learning library to "learn" these gestures, and finally write simple sketches that are triggered by the gestures we taught to the machine.

This class is taught by Kat Sullivan, a Brooklyn based artist interested in the intersection between movement and technology. Working with a variety of mediums, she looks for ways movement and technology can form relationships rather than simply share a space.

Frequently Asked Questions

Below, you'll find answer to common questions related to the classes at Brooklyn Research. If you can't find the answer to your question, feel free to send us an email at classes@brooklynresearch.org. We'd love to hear from you.

Where are the classes taught?

Classes are taught at Brooklyn Research facilities on the 6th Floor of the old Pfizer Building, right in the heart of Brooklyn. The address is 630 Flushing Avenue but the main entrance is at 28 Tompkins Avenue. The building is easily accessible from the G train (Flushing Ave station) and from the J/M trains (Flushing Ave station).

How long are the classes?

It depends on the format. Intensive two-day weekend workshops have about 6 hours of class each day. Shorter workshops on weeknights or weekends are 2-4 hours. Talks usually go for 1 to 2 hours.

Do I need to bring anything?

For most classes, laptops will suffice. Each class has its own set of prerequisites listed in the course description, with instructions on how get setup prior to the the start of the workshop. There will be a half hour period before the start of each workshop that is highly recommended for anyone unsure if they are set up properly.

How do I pay?

We use EventBrite and CourseHorse for handling payments. We can also arrange for on-site payments via credit card or cash half an hour prior to the commencement of class.

Do you take groups?

Yes, we certainly do. Please inquire about our payment options and special scheduling for groups.

What is Brooklyn Research?

Brooklyn Research is a collective of scientist, artists, futurists and creative technologists. We have been doing commercial and noncommercial projects using our skills and passions for the past 5 years. Recently, we have felt the need to share some of our skills by offering original and experiment oriented workshops. That’s how the idea of Brooklyn Research classes were born.

Do I need to know programming?

It depends on the course. Since most workshops are experimental, exploring the frontiers of a discipline, we require that you have good prior knowledge of the skills and tools discussed in the course. On the other hand, many courses are more oriented to beginners and do not require significant prior coding experience. Look for “Prerequisites” in the course listing for specifics.

Do you offer financial assistance?

We unfortunately do not offer financial assistance or scholarships at this time. We are a small organization with limited resources at the moment and are actively looking for ways to create sponsorships both internally and with outside sponsors. As an organization, we want to encourage diversity within our workshops and in general, so please bear with us as we search for a way to make this work and check back with us on our site or our newsletter for when we are able to offer financial assistance for workshop attendees!

Can I teach a class?

I you have interesting skills you would like to teach or have a cool project you would like to give a talk on, we would love to hear from you! Fill out our form to tell us a little more about yourself and what you are thinking for your workshop or talk.