Details
Date:

August 17

Time:

04:00 pm - 06:00 pm

Click to Register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/presenting-nfodr-fwrd-digifab-tickets-68191756379
Organizer

Brooklyn Research

Website: https://www.eventbrite.com/o/brooklyn-research-13557011404
Venue

Brooklyn Research

630 Flushing Avenue #6th floor, Brooklyn, NY 11206

Brooklyn, NY, US, 11206

NFODR (New Forms of Data Representation) is the 2019 Summer Research Session at Brooklyn Research. This year’s team,Carla Molins Pitarch and Nuntinee Tansrisakul, have spent the past 12 weeks exploring new ways of representing quantitative information. Their research has taken them on a truly expansive journey that has spanned the macro to the micro. One one end of the spectrum their work this summer has involved communication with a number of satellites orbiting earth such as NASA’s NOAA and other satellites. On the other end the world of slime molds are explored as a way of representing data.


FWRD is a collaboration between Tomorrow Lab®  and Brooklyn Research and is part of the Futureworks Shops R+D Fellowship — a citywide open-research program for industrial designers and engineers run by SecondMuse and funded by NYCEDCThis year’s FWRD fellows are: Angel Lamar Oliveras, Beverly Chou, and Lilian Yi-Hsuan Lin. Together they have been investigating a question that affects all of our lives: Where does our food come from? The FWRD team has been answering this question by designing a strategy board game for high school students that focuses on global food distribution. They hope their game will spark students’ interest in learning more about the global food system. 


DIGIFAB resident Neyva Hernandez will be presenting works she created and processes she used as part of our Digital Fabrication residency through the summer including work with kerfing patterns on a laser cutter, digital embroidery, and 3D printing as part of the mold making process


DIGIFAB resident Aidan Nelson has been developing a software interface for a motion platform from the ground up — translating motion into motor control, implementing safe limits and designing motion cues which can be perceived as movement by our inner ears. When paired with virtual reality, a motion platform can fool us into believing we are piloting a spaceship, surfing a 150 foot wave or fluttering about on the wings of a butterfly.


Join us for these exciting presentations and play test the FWRD team’s game at the party that evening.